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Understanding MySQL Internals - Helion

Understanding MySQL Internals
ebook
Autor: Sasha Pachev
ISBN: 978-0-5965-5280-0
stron: 258, Format: ebook
Data wydania: 2007-04-10
Księgarnia: Helion

Cena książki: 135,15 zł (poprzednio: 157,15 zł)
Oszczędzasz: 14% (-22,00 zł)

Dodaj do koszyka Understanding MySQL Internals

Although MySQL's source code is open in the sense of being publicly available, it's essentially closed to you if you don't understand it. In this book, Sasha Pachev -- a former member of the MySQL Development Team -- provides a comprehensive tour of MySQL 5 that shows you how to figure out the inner workings of this powerful database. You'll go right to heart of the database to learn how data structures and convenience functions operate, how to add new storage engines and configuration options, and much more.



The core of Understanding MySQL Internals begins with an Architecture Overview that provides a brief introduction of how the different components of MySQL work together. You then learn the steps for setting up a working compilable copy of the code that you can change and test at your pleasure. Other sections of the book cover:



  • Core server classes, structures, and API
  • The communication protocol between the client and the server
  • Configuration variables, the controls of the server; includes a tutorial on how to add your own
  • Thread-based request handling -- understanding threads and how they are used in MySQL
  • An overview of MySQL storage engines
  • The storage engine interface for integrating third-party storage engines
  • The table lock manager
  • The parser and optimizer for improving MySQL's performance
  • Integrating a transactional storage engine into MySQL
  • The internals of replication




Understanding MySQL Internals provides unprecedented opportunities for developers, DBAs, database application programmers, IT departments, software vendors, and computer science students to learn about the inner workings of this enterprise-proven database. With this book, you will soon reach a new level of comprehension regarding database development that will enable you to accomplish your goals. It's your guide to discovering and improving a great database.

Dodaj do koszyka Understanding MySQL Internals

 

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Dodaj do koszyka Understanding MySQL Internals

Spis treści

Understanding MySQL Internals eBook -- spis treści

  • Understanding MySQL Internals
    • SPECIAL OFFER: Upgrade this ebook with OReilly
    • A Note Regarding Supplemental Files
    • Preface
      • How This Book Is Organized
      • Who This Book Is For
      • Conventions Used in This Book
      • Using Code Examples
      • Comments and Questions
      • Safari Enabled
      • Acknowledgments
    • 1. MySQL History and Architecturel
      • 1.1. MySQL History
      • 1.2. MySQL Architecture
        • 1.2.1. Core Modules
        • 1.2.2. Interaction of the Core Modules
        • 1.2.3. Detailed Look at the Core Modules
          • 1.2.3.1. Server Initialization Module
          • 1.2.3.2. Connection Manager
          • 1.2.3.3. Thread Manager
          • 1.2.3.4. Connection Thread
          • 1.2.3.5. User Authentication Module
          • 1.2.3.6. Access Control Module
          • 1.2.3.7. Parser
          • 1.2.3.8. Command Dispatcher
          • 1.2.3.9. Query Cache Module
          • 1.2.3.10. Optimizer
          • 1.2.3.11. Table Manager
          • 1.2.3.12. Table Modification Modules
          • 1.2.3.13. Table Maintenance Module
          • 1.2.3.14. Status Reporting Module
          • 1.2.3.15. Abstracted Storage Engine Interface (Table Handler)
          • 1.2.3.16. Storage Engine Implementations (MyISAM, InnoDB, MEMORY, Berkeley DB)
          • 1.2.3.17. Logging Module
          • 1.2.3.18. Replication Master Module
          • 1.2.3.19. Replication Slave Module
          • 1.2.3.20. Client/Server Protocol API
          • 1.2.3.21. Low-Level Network I/O API
          • 1.2.3.22. Core API
    • 2. Nuts and Bolts of Working with the MySQL Source Code
      • 2.1. Unix Shell
      • 2.2. BitKeeper
      • 2.3. Preparing the System to Build MySQL from BitKeeper Tree
      • 2.4. Building MySQL from BitKeeper Tree
      • 2.5. Building from Source Distribution
      • 2.6. Installing MySQL into a System Directory
      • 2.7. Source Code Directory Layout
      • 2.8. Preparing the System to Run MySQL in a Debugger
      • 2.9. Debugger-Guided Source Tour
      • 2.10. Basics of Working with gdb
      • 2.11. Finding Things in the Source
      • 2.12. Interesting Breakpoints and Variables
      • 2.13. Making a Source Modification
      • 2.14. Coding Guidelines
        • 2.14.1. Stability
        • 2.14.2. Portability
        • 2.14.3. Performance
        • 2.14.4. Style and Ease of Integration
      • 2.15. Keeping Your BitKeeper Repository Up to Date
      • 2.16. Submitting a Patch
    • 3. Core Classes, Structures, Variables, and APIs
      • 3.1. THD
      • 3.2. NET
      • 3.3. TABLE
      • 3.4. Field
      • 3.5. Utility API Calls
      • 3.6. Preprocessor Macros
      • 3.7. Global Variables
    • 4. Client/Server Communication
      • 4.1. Protocol Overview
      • 4.2. Packet Format
      • 4.3. Relationship Between MySQL Protocol and OS Layer
      • 4.4. Authenticating Handshake
        • 4.4.1. Authentication Protocol Security
        • 4.4.2. Protocol Capabilities Bit Mask
      • 4.5. Command Packet
      • 4.6. Server Responses
        • 4.6.1. Data Field
        • 4.6.2. OK Packet
        • 4.6.3. Error Packet
        • 4.6.4. EOF Packet
        • 4.6.5. Result Set Packets
    • 5. Configuration Variables
      • 5.1. Configuration Variables Tutorial
        • 5.1.1. Configuration File and Command-Line Options
        • 5.1.2. Internals of the Configuration Option Parsing
        • 5.1.3. Example of Adding a New Configuration Option
      • 5.2. Interesting Aspects of Specific Configuration Variables
        • 5.2.1. big-tables
        • 5.2.2. concurrent-insert
        • 5.2.3. core-file
        • 5.2.4. default-storage-engine
        • 5.2.5. delay-key-write
        • 5.2.6. ft_stopword_file
        • 5.2.7. innodb_buffer_pool_size
        • 5.2.8. innodb_flush_log_at_trx_commit
        • 5.2.9. innodb_file_per_table
        • 5.2.10. innodb_lock_wait_timeout
        • 5.2.11. innodb_force_recovery
        • 5.2.12. init-file
        • 5.2.13. key_buffer_size
        • 5.2.14. language
        • 5.2.15. log
        • 5.2.16. log-bin
        • 5.2.17. log-isam
        • 5.2.18. log-slow-queries
        • 5.2.19. max_allowed_packet
        • 5.2.20. max_connections
        • 5.2.21. max_heap_table_size
        • 5.2.22. max_join_size
        • 5.2.23. max_sort_length
        • 5.2.24. myisam-recover
        • 5.2.25. query_cache_type
        • 5.2.26. read_buffer_size
        • 5.2.27. relay-log
        • 5.2.28. server-id
        • 5.2.29. skip-grant-tables
        • 5.2.30. skip-stack-trace
        • 5.2.31. slave-skip-errors
        • 5.2.32. sort_buffer_size
        • 5.2.33. sql-mode
        • 5.2.34. table_cache
        • 5.2.35. temp-pool
        • 5.2.36. transaction-isolation
    • 6. Thread-Based Request Handling
      • 6.1. Threads Versus Processes
        • 6.1.1. Advantages of Using Threads
        • 6.1.2. Disadvantages of Using Threads
        • 6.1.3. Advantages of Using Forked Processes
        • 6.1.4. Disadvantages of Using Forked Processes
      • 6.2. Implementation of Request Handling
        • 6.2.1. Structures, Variables, Classes, and API
        • 6.2.2. Execution Walk-Through
      • 6.3. Thread Programming Issues
        • 6.3.1. Standard C Library Calls
        • 6.3.2. Mutually Exclusive Locks (Mutexes)
        • 6.3.3. Read-Write Locks
        • 6.3.4. Synchronization
        • 6.3.5. Preemption
    • 7. The Storage Engine Interface
      • 7.1. The handler Class
        • 7.1.1. handlerton
      • 7.2. Adding a Custom Storage Engine to MySQL
        • 7.2.1. Integration Instructions for Version 4.1
        • 7.2.2. Integration Instructions for Version 5.1
    • 8. Concurrent Access and Locking
      • 8.1. Table Lock Manager
        • 8.1.1. Read Lock Request
        • 8.1.2. Write Lock Request
          • 8.1.2.1. Storage engine interaction with the table lock manager
        • 8.1.3. InnoDB Locking
          • 8.1.3.1. Lock types
          • 8.1.3.2. Record locking
          • 8.1.3.4. Dealing with deadlocks
    • 9. Parser and Optimizer
      • 9.1. Parser
        • 9.1.1. Lexical Scanner
        • 9.1.2. Grammar Rules Module
        • 9.1.3. Parse Tree
      • 9.2. Optimizer
        • 9.2.1. Basics of the Optimizer Algorithm
        • 9.2.2. Using EXPLAIN to Understand the Optimizer
          • 9.2.2.1. Understanding the output of EXPLAIN
          • 9.2.2.2. Select types
          • 9.2.2.3. Record access types
          • 9.2.2.4. Extra field
        • 9.2.3. Range Optimizer
          • 9.2.3.1. Range
          • 9.2.3.2. Index_merge
          • 9.2.3.3. Range_desc
          • 9.2.3.4. Fulltext
          • 9.2.3.5. ROR_intersect
          • 9.2.3.6. ROR_union
          • 9.2.3.7. Group_min_max
        • 9.2.4. Subquery Optimization
        • 9.2.5. Core Optimizer Classes and Structures
          • 9.2.5.1. JOIN
          • 9.2.5.2. JOIN_TAB
          • 9.2.5.3. select_result
        • 9.2.6. SELECT Parse Tree
          • 9.2.6.1. Execution of a SELECT on the code level
    • 10. Storage Engines
      • 10.1. Shared Aspects of Architecture
        • 10.1.1. MyISAM
        • 10.1.2. MyISAM Architecture
          • 10.1.2.1. Datafile
          • 10.1.2.2. Index file
        • 10.1.3. MyISAM Key Types
          • 10.1.3.1. B-tree keys
          • 10.1.3.2. Full-text keys
          • 10.1.3.4. Spatial keys
      • 10.2. InnoDB
      • 10.3. Memory (Heap)
      • 10.4. MyISAM Merge
      • 10.5. NDB
      • 10.6. Archive
      • 10.7. Federated
    • 11. Transactions
      • 11.1. Overview of Transactional Storage Engine Implementation
      • 11.2. Implementing the handler Subclass
      • 11.3. Defining the handlerton
      • 11.4. Working with the Query Cache
      • 11.5. Working with the Replication Binary Log
      • 11.6. Avoiding Deadlocks
    • 12. Replication
      • 12.1. Overview
      • 12.2. Statement-Based Versus Row-Based Replication
      • 12.3. Two-Threaded Slave
      • 12.4. Multi-Master
      • 12.5. SQL Commands to Help Understand Replication
      • 12.6. Binary Log Format
      • 12.7. Creating a Custom Replication Utility
    • About the Author
    • Colophon
    • SPECIAL OFFER: Upgrade this ebook with OReilly

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